US, Canada still have work to do on NAFTA

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Freeland said the memorials should help to add some context to the ongoing negotiations on free trade that were started at Trump's behest.

Solemn cross-border remembrances slammed headlong into the present-day fight over free trade Tuesday as Canada and the USA resumed their protracted effort to rescue NAFTA on the 17th anniversary of the September 11 terrorist attacks in Washington and New York City.

Canada and the United States have been negotiating since August 28 after Washington unveiled a proposed North American free-trade deal with Mexico and pressed Canada to sign on or be left out.

Uncertainly over the future of NAFTA, which underpins $1.2 trillion in North American trade, is weighing on markets as well as the Canadian and Mexican currencies.

"I believe things are going to work out". Under U.S. trade negotiating laws, a text for that agreement is due by October 1. "There (just) seems to be a wild card on there".

Former federal Canadian trade official Matthew Kronby said the reported American demands indicate to him that the White House doesn't really want to strike a deal with Canada.

New chapters governing the digital economy and stronger intellectual property, labor and environmental standards could also work to the benefit of US companies, possibly helping Trump to fulfill his campaign promise of creating more American jobs.

A study commissioned by the Canadian Embassy says 9 million jobs "spread across every congressional district" are supported by the Canada-U.S. economic partnership.

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He said, however, it was wrong for Canada to have publicly declared it would not accept concessions on certain files.

Chrystia Freeland, Canada's foreign minister, returned to Washington on Tuesday for talks with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer. Canada and the U.S.

"Maybe that helps us all put into perspective the negotiations that we're having - and also put into a little bit of historical perspective the importance and the significance of the relationship between Canada and the United States", she said of the anniversary. "I think it will be gone". "People are kind of sitting on the sidelines thinking, 'How will this affect us in the future?' If we were to lose the auto industry here that would put us into some type of recession", Chiodo said, noting that the auto trade has "always been pretty fair" for both the USA and Canada. But he noted that the pain would be felt on both sides of the border.

His comments echoed Trump, who said on Tuesday that while Ottawa wants a deal, he could go either way, depending on what concessions will come from the talks.

"This isn't like some of the other NAFTA rounds where people were introducing poison pills for political reasons or otherwise", he said.

That's a position that's been echoed by numerous experts, even as the political rhetoric continues to remain charged. "The ruination of the country", Trump said at an event in North Dakota. "I can - all I have to do is tax cars - it would be devastating".

Canada's protected dairy industry is one of three sticking points in NAFTA talks between the two countries, along with a system for settling trade disputes and cultural protections for Canadian media firms.

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