Inspector General Debunks Trump's Political Bias Claims Against Comey

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President Donald Trump is looking to the report to provide a fresh line of attack against two former top FBI officials, Comey and his deputy, Andrew McCabe, as he claims that a politically tainted bureau tried to undermine his campaign and, through the later Russian Federation investigation, his presidency.

"Despite the partisan nature of the conversation between the DOJ officials, Bloomberg is reporting that the IG report exonerates the individuals of committing "political bias", claiming "[Investigators] did not find documentary or testimonial evidence [in the Clinton case] that improper considerations, including political bias, directly affected the specific investigative actions we reviewed".

In July 2016, Mr Comey, then Federal Bureau of Investigation director, held a news conference announcing that Mrs Clinton would not be criminally charged for her decision use a private email server for government business during her time as USA secretary of state.

The investigation expanded to touch on an array of politically sensitive decisions by officials including Mr Comey and Loretta Lynch, the former attorney general.

More recently, the President has signaled a hope that the inspector general's report will vindicate his instincts on Comey.

"James Comey's legal problems continue to grow", said Chaffetz, arguing Comey divulged classified information just like Clinton did when he leaked his memos on his conversations with President Trump.

In his report, Horowitz said he found a "troubling lack of any direct, substantive communication" between Comey and Lynch ahead of the July 5 press conference and also Comey's October 28 letter informing Congress of the discovery of emails related to the probe found on the laptop of former Rep. Anthony Weiner.

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A Justice Department spokesman confirmed Thursday that the report will include discussion of additional text messages between Strzok and Page.

Horowitz is also expected to provide a frank assessment of how former FBI Director James Comey ignored longstanding departmental norms at key moments in the Clinton probe.

The inspector general's report was originally expected in May, and earlier this month, Trump questioned on Twitter whether its publication had been delayed because the findings were "being changed and made weaker".

Bloomberg News first reported the details of the inspector general report. According to Comey, his decision to announce the reopening publicly was based on the assumption Clinton would win the election, and motivated by a desire not to be seen as helping her. Page left the FBI in May but Strzok, once the No. 2 in the counterintelligence division, remains at the bureau, now stationed in human resources.

Trump lashed out anew at the investigation on Thursday in a pair of tweets.

Comey has said he felt compelled to alert Congress to the new emails, after having previously testified that the investigation was done.

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