Apple’s App Store officially bans cryptocurrency mining

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It's a new rule included in the latest version of Apple's App Store policies, released last week as part of the company's annual developer conference.

Two sections have been updated in the new App Store Review Guidelines -section 2.4.2 (Hardware Compatibility) and 3.1.5 (b) (ii) (Cryptocurrencies).

Apple has also outlawed apps from mining cryptocurrencies on the device altogether.

Since the App Store is virtually the only place to acquire software for iPhones, iPads, iPod touches, Apple TVs, and Apple Watches, Apple's decision will effectively end crypto mining on those devices.

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The only limitation that Apple are putting down is that no apps will be allowed that encourage payments of cryptocurrencies or the incentivisation of cryptocurrencies to people who download certain apps or advertise certain cryptocurrency-based apps. The former says that apps "may not run unrelated background processes, such as cryptocurrency mining".

Apple additionally wants to ensure the seriousness of Initial Coin Offerings, cryptocurrency futures trading, and other crypto-securities or quasi-securities trading.

Moreover, Apple will no longer allow reward-based crypto marketing with App Store listed apps.

In July 2017, Apple 'approved' Dash as a cryptocurrency. Apple allows apps like Coinbase and Robinhood to enable users to trade Bitcoin, Ethereum, and other cryptocurrencies, so it's not a complete ban on mobile crypto. On macOS, however, users will continue to be able to acquire apps outside of the Mac App Store, enabling mining and other activities to continue without Apple's seal of approval. The company took this step after hidden cryptocurrency mining has become the most popular cybercrime trend among malware developers this past year. The guidelines noted: "Cryptocurrency apps may not offer currency for completing tasks, such as downloading other apps, encouraging other users to download, posting to social networks, etc".

The guidelines do allow apps that facilitate ICOs, as long as they work with established banks and follow all applicable compliance laws.

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