Google pulling Chrome auto mute functionality after it silenced some web games

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As such, version 66.0.3359.181 of Chrome for Mac, Windows, and Linux today removes the autoplay policy for this API.

The Chrome team said that the changes will not impact the web browser's new feature of silencing Internet videos and audio that have an autoplay feature.

Google scaled back a new auto-play policy in the latest version of its Chrome web browser, meant to stop unwanted video ads with sound from serving up and playing without notice.

Google has made it clear that this is a temporary change and that it has been made to give developers time to change their code. For example, sound on many audio apps and other interactive experiences no longer plays, with developers required to update many sites. "If you are honest in your claim that the side effects of the policy were unintended and unwanted, you should commit-in clear, straightforward language-to finding other alternatives which do not break vast swathes of cultural work that was developed and distributed on the open web".

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Pallett urged developers to prepare for Chrome 70 by following its autoplay instructions for the Web Audio API.

Meanwhile, the implementation delay will give "Web Audio API developers for gaming, audio applications, some RTC features more time to update their code". Some requested user interface elements that would allow people to control how autoplay content is handled in Chrome, while others simply wanted their games to play their usual variety of music and in-game sounds.

This is, apparently, reasonably easy to do; however, some users have complained that, even with several months to act, not every game, art project, or whatever else will be updated.

Google has had to temporarily break one of Chrome's newest features because it was proving more troublesome than the annoying problem it was supposed to tackle. Chrome had started to block audio and video that automatically played on certain websites. Unless web developers scramble to use the Web Audio API instead of those tags, Chrome should continue to save your ears from unwanted and potentially obnoxious noises while you browse. In response to the outrage, Google is temporarily rolling back some of the changes.

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