Samsung Gets Hit With Lawsuit Over Biometrics Patents

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When it comes to filing and fighting for patents, Samsung is one of the first that will go and really fight for its technologies.

Encryption technology research firm PACid Technologies has filed a lawsuit against Samsung Electronics for allegedly infringing upon its biometric patents.

United States data security firm PACid Technologies is suing the Galaxy smartphone maker for apparently infringing on three patents which relate to its biometric authentication tech. The case was filed in April at the Texas Eastern District Court. The suit alleges that Samsung used these patents to help it develop its fingerprint, face and iris scanners. The suit concerns three patents, believed to be related to the biometric security features of Samsung's recent Galaxy devices; specifically, the Galaxy S6, Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S8 (and the Edge/Plus variants thereof). PACid Technologies also claims that the aforementioned three patents were infringed by the Samsung PASS identity management service, and the Samsung KNOX mobile enterprise security system.

Researchers Catch Android OEMs Lying About Security Patches
For example, Samsung's 2016 J3 claimed to have every 2017 Android patch installed but in fact when 12 weren't actually installed. The shoddy state of Android security on smartphones may down to some smartphone makers skipping security updates from Google .

If the company is indeed a "patent troll", it is likely seeking some kind of settlement with its target. The suit seeks damages of $3 per phone, which ETNews notes is three times the standard rate of $1 per phone, which would end up costing Samsung about $2.8 billion if the court ruled in PACid's favor.

It's worth noting that according to South Korean news outlet The Investor, PACid is considered by industry sources to be "a patent troll whose business model rests exclusively on suing companies that actually develop and sell products based on loose interpretations of intellectual property regulations".

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