Uber Drivers Get Mandated Six-Hour Rest Breaks

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The update, expected to be rolled out nationally over a two-week period, will prompt drivers to take a six-hour break after 12 cumulative hours behind the wheel.

The change won't affect most drivers, as over 60 percent don't use Uber more than 10 hours a day. Drivers will only be able to begin accepting new trip requests after the app is deactivated for six straight hours. Even if a driver does punctuate their shift with sporadic shorter breaks, it appears that the 12 hour limit will still apply: The only way to reset the clock is by taking an uninterrupted six-hour break. Uber is now broadening the rule to all US drivers that use its app.

"If I'm driving for Uber or just going down the street to get groceries and I'm too exhausted, ill just wait", he said.

This move will strengthen our approach to help keep riders and drivers safe on the road while preserving the flexibility drivers tell us they love.

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Moreover, there is nothing stopping drivers from "moonlighting" - working their normal job during the day, then driving for Uber at night - and there's no real way of knowing how well-rested a driver really is. According to Scott Coriell, spokesman for Lyft, "the company's drivers must take a 6-hour break for every 14 hours they're in driver mode". The company said that it took driver experience and road safety groups feedback to calculate the totals it came up with. They could, for example, switch between different ride-hailing services, so that when their time's up with Uber they turn on Lyft.

It will also alert drivers when they're close to the 12-hour mark. The campaign was aimed at sleep-deprived office workers, rather than Uber drivers, who Uber encouraged to call a ride through its app instead of getting behind the wheel.

In 2017, Uber fought a proposal in MA to limit drivers to 16 hours a day, or 70 hours a week, calling it (pdf, p. 10) "unworkable" and "overly burdensome". Many US cities also regulate the number of hours taxi drivers can work, though those restrictions typically haven't applied to app-based ride services.

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