Government develops artificial intelligence program to stop online extremism

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But when pushed about who stands to benefit from the Home Office algorithm, everyone involved in the programme was left to concede the world's most popular video platforms had their own AI teams developing extremist-detecting tools.

'This Government has been taking the lead worldwide in making sure that vile terrorist content is stamped out'.

Speaking ahead of a two-day visit to Silicon Valley, home secretary Amber Rudd said: "Over the a year ago we have been engaging with internet companies to make sure that their platforms are not being abused by terrorists and their supporters".

The AI technology has been trained by analysing more than 1,000 Isis videos, automatically detecting 94% of propaganda with a 99.99% success rate.

Concerns over the availability of material such as execution videos, recruitment campaigns and bomb-making instructions on the internet intensified after a wave of terrorist atrocities hit Britain in 2017.

Web firms have been told to increase efforts to remove terror-related posts after the United Kingdom was hit by attacks in and Manchester previous year.

Created to be used on any platform, it can support the detection of terrorist propaganda across a range of video-streaming and download sites in real-time.

Web firms have been told to increase efforts to remove terror-related posts after the UK was hit by attacks in London and Manchester last year
Home Office unveils AI tool to crack down on extremist content online

The software, designed by the Home Office, detects 94 per cent of terror material.

The tool is platform agnostic and can be used to find terrorist content across nearly any video-streaming or download sites in real-time, according to the Home Office.

The British government said that the technology was developed in order to prevent smaller video content publishers without large budgets from inadvertently spreading ISIS content.

Such is the degree of accuracy, if one million randomly selected videos are examined, only 50 would require additional review by a person.

Home Secretary Amber Rudd, who is in the United States to discuss online security with major tech companies, said: Over the previous year we have been engaging with internet companies to make sure that their platforms are not being abused by terrorists and their supporters.

"The way to fight that is to cut the propaganda off at the source".

He said major organisations such as Google and Facebook "can't solve this problem alone".

United Kingdom unveils tools to block extremist content online
New Home Office research shows that 145 new platforms from July until the end of 2017 had not been used for terrorist content before.

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